Leonard Cheshire Disability’s Can Do Sport programme kick-starts

Leonard Cheshire Disability’s Can Do Sport programmes in Essex, London, Manchester, Merseyside and West Yorkshire have been given £147,000 from Sport England and the #iwill Fund - all thanks to funding from the National Lottery.

Person holding basketball - Leonard Cheshire Disability’s Can Do Sport programme aims to get 1,500 young disabled people into sport over the next three years

Can Do Sport is a new initiative that will start in January and harness the power of sport to support young disabled people.

Sport England’s Director of Sport Phil Smith said: “Through social action young people can help others get active and benefit themselves in lots of ways; social action can do wonders for job and career prospects, mental health and making friends. 

“That’s why volunteering and social action is a key part of Sport England’s new strategy, Towards an Active Nation. We’re delighted to be helping Leonard Cheshire Disability’s Can Do Sport initiative enable more young people to be the catalysts for change in their neighbourhood. 

“It’s one of 32 projects in which Sport England is investing over £4 million to support volunteering projects and opportunities between now and 2021. These projects will test various different approaches, with the ultimate aim being a larger number and more diverse volunteers. We are targeting people who are currently less likely to volunteer in sport, such as women, disabled people, people from BAME groups and people on a low income.”

The #iwill campaign is run by the charity Step Up To Serve. Its Chief Executive, Dr Rania Marandos, said: “Young people across the country often start their social action journey through community sport. Sport has the potential to enable even more young people to make a contribution to their communities whilst developing their own skills and wellbeing. It is fantastic to see such a range of projects receive funding through the #iwill campaign’s partnership with Sport England in support of our collective aim of making meaningful social action part of life for more 10 to 20-year-olds.”